FELISSIMO > 200th Anniversary Finlayson × FELISSIMO Design Competition

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DESIGN COMPETITION DESIGN COMPETITION
DESIGN COMPETITION DESIGN COMPETITION
200 YEARS Finlayson Finlayson×FELISSIMO

DESIGNCOMPETITION

Final shortlist of designs

DESIGN COMPETITIONDESIGN COMPETITION
DESIGN COMPETITIONDESIGN COMPETITION

The Finlayson × Felissimo design competition received over 2300 designs from Finland and Japan. The jury carefully selected a shortlist of nine designs that will progress to the final phase of the competition. The shortlisted designs are listed below.From these 9 designes, we are currently selecting two grand prizes.
The Jury will select 2 final winners from the shortlist by mid December, 2020.

Competition theme

" Beauty, that I would miss "

Please vote for your favorite design
to win the public vote award!
*You can vote for one work per day
*By pressing ♡, you can vote!
*Voting is closed in mid-December. Thank you for voting!
  • Ajojää

    Ajojää

    Designed by Timo Sulkamo

    Snow and ice are an important parts of Finnish nature and identity. They arrive every winter, but they disappear every spring.

    Last winter, however, the coast of southern Finland never froze.

    Will our sea ever freeze again?
    "Ajojää" (drift ice) reflects this idea with abstract, but at the same time traditional imagery.

    Entry
    no.
    1

  • Cho no mure

    Cho no mure

    Designed by kijinichijo

    I wish the person wearing the textile feels "the joy of being able to run freely outside".

    We may feel more beautiful when things like flowers and butterflies gather together. It is a scenery I cannot see because their number is gradually decreasing due to environmental change. Things which existed when I was young but have been forgotten over time.

    Entry
    no.
    2

  • Dialect

    Dialect

    Designed by Noora Typpö


    Beauty, that I would miss, can be found in languages around the world. Dialects are a huge part of our cultures, habits and the ways we live. Older dialects are constantly disappearing while new ones are forming.

    I created this pattern design with the technique of 'word weaving'. I chose suitable words and started weaving with the letters. In this design, you can find words like 'dialect', 'kotoba' (Japanese: 'word' or 'language'), 'murre' (Finnish: 'dialect') and 'sana' (Finnish: 'word').

    The end result is a meandering collage about the beauty of words, language and dialects.

    Entry
    no.
    3

  • Hanagasumi

    Hanagasumi(cherry blossoms appearing from afar like white mist)

    Designed by Marina Komura

    I drew a view of cherry blossoms in the mist. The lifespan of a typical Japanese cherry tree (Yoshino cherry tree) is said to be 100 years. Most of them were planted after the World War II, so It’s an issue we need to think about now. As metropolitan governor Koike said ”Cherry trees will blossom next year too”. Cherry trees will blossom every Spring but we should break that mindset and plant trees to ensure the continuation. Cherry trees are special for the Japanese. I hope that Finnish people also understand the fascination of cherry blossoms and our deep feelings towards them. To think about planting trees, I chose the theme of cherry blossoms. The beauty of cherry blossoms is not limited to when they are in full bloom. I focused on the beauty of the leaves that are often overlooked. Rabbits and bullfinches are the natural enemies of cherry trees. I drew an ideal of coexistence where cherry blossoms keep their beauty.

    Entry
    no.
    4

  • hay

    hay

    Designed by Kazunori Sakurai

    The scenery that looked idyllic will change its shape more and more in the modernization.

    Efficiency supports productivity and writes the scenery. It's not a bad thing, but I feel some loneliness.

    Entry
    no.
    5

  • Kaoku

    Kaoku

    Designed by Tohka Shirakawa

    I designed this with Japanese architecture in my mind when I thought about the beautiful things I don’t want to lose. The motif is a Japanese house and especially an Edo row house built in Edo-city in the Edo era. I was born, raised and still live in Tokyo but I haven’t seen the Edo row houses which might have been standing here at that time. Japanese houses are precious because they are wooden buildings and therefore very difficult to save. They might not exist in 100 or 200 years. I hope I can still see the remaining Japanese houses and I wanted to save the design for the future when it may not be possible.

    Entry
    no.
    6

  • NONKI

    NONKI

    Designed by Yuri Kitamura

    This is an image of my freely growing flowers. When I give them water, the drops shine and look very beautiful. I want to cherish them forever.

    Entry
    no.
    7

  • Ohikiitävät

    Ohikiitävät

    Designed by Kaisla Kujanpää

    I was travelling by bus and watching out of the window.

    It was a beautiful summer day and the fields full of flowers were passing by. They were so beautiful but at the same time, I think they are so normal and invisible for most of the people. We are just driving past them not seeing the beauty. I wanted to make a pattern about these unnoticeable flowers and plants.

    Entry
    no.
    8

  • Saku

    Saku

    Designed by Akiko Tsurusaki

    This design is one of four patterns that I created to represent the four seasons that are being threatened by global warming. Both Finland and Japan have beautiful four seasons to be proud of I am afraid that this cycle will disappear in the near future.

    In Saku, the laid-back vitality, passion, energy, and strength of the sun are expressed by comparing them to the large summer flowers.

    Entry
    no.
    9

※The display order is the alphabetical order of the titles.